Вести:
Tools
You are here: Почетна|Медиа Центар|Говори|Говор на Н.Е. Пол Д. Волерс
Говор на Н.Е. Пол Д. Волерс PDF Печати Е-пошта
Среда, 17 Септември 2014 10:30

Wohlers










“Future NATO – Challenges and Expectations”

Remarks at Euro-Atlantic Council of Macedonia Conference

September 2, 2014

Ambassador Paul D. Wohlers

Good morning, and thank you.  It is a pleasure to be here at the Euro-Atlantic Council of Macedonia’s conference on future NATO challenges and expectations.  This is an important topic at any time, but especially now, as we lead up to this week’s NATO summit in Wales, and in the face of new challenges to transatlantic security, especially along the eastern borders of several NATO member states.

NATO is the transatlantic core of the global security community, and it embodies the conviction that North America and Europe are inextricably bound together.  In the years since NATO’s formation in 1949, it has become clear that the security that comes from military cooperation and collective defense also fosters a broader kind of success – it encourages democratization and spurs nations’ economic and political progress as well.  No part of the world has been more prosperous, stable, and peaceful over the last 65 years than the countries that belong to NATO.  

NATO’s stabilizing influence helped Europe emerge from the darkness of the Second World War and strengthened bonds between the Allies throughout the Cold War years.  And as the new millennium has brought new challenges of terrorism, demonstrating that political chaos in distant lands can have a devastating effect on Allies at home, and of aggression in eastern Europe, NATO’s security commitment has become even more relevant and significant.  
The world has certainly changed since 1949, when NATO was formed.  As you know as well as anyone, in 1949 the map of Europe looked very different than it does today.  The Alliance stood then as a bridge between two continents, connecting the widely-separated lands of Europe and North America through the bonds of our shared security interests.  And now in 2014, when new technologies allow instantaneous movement of information across formerly formidable physical borders and distances, the Alliance seeks to support global security through non-military approaches as well, while maintaining modern, highly capable, interoperable, and deployable forces.  

Although not yet a NATO member, as a valued partner Macedonia plays an important role in the Alliance.  Macedonia has been a steadfast ally in international peace support operations for more than a decade, contributing 2,786 troops to ISAF since 2003, and 490 troops in Iraq through the end of 2008.  Currently, 153 Macedonian soldiers are deployed to Afghanistan, and Macedonia has committed forces to the follow-on NATO Resolute Support Mission, to help train, advise, and assist Afghan National Security Forces after 2014.  

To increase Macedonia’s interoperability with NATO and support NATO Partnership goals, the U.S. has executed extensive security cooperation programs in Macedonia since 1995, with assistance focused on defense reform, training, and modernization.  In addition, Macedonia and the Vermont National Guard have developed a strong relationship over two decades, engaging in more than 700 military-to-military events, including the co-deployment of 79 Macedonian soldiers in 2010 with the 86th Infantry Brigade Combat Team as part of Operation Enduring Freedom.  Our cooperative military activities with Macedonia speak volumes about the strength of our partnership, and have greatly strengthened the capabilities of the Army of the Republic of Macedonia.
Before I speak about the themes that Alliance leaders will discuss in this year’s Summit, I want to be up front and clear about what the Summit will not address.  I know this is not what Macedonia is hoping to hear, but it’s important to make clear that there are no plans to add new members to the Alliance at the Wales Summit.  And while I wish I had better news to offer, at the same time I want to strongly reinforce that the United States believes that Macedonia will be a valuable NATO member; it is only a question of when.  We remain committed to the Open Door Policy, and we will continue to work with Macedonia, as well as the other aspirant nations, as you continue to reform and modernize en route to full NATO membership.  No one wants Macedonia in NATO more than the United States, and we will continue to be involved in efforts to make that possible.  

So what will be discussed in Cardiff?  Let me mention some of the themes that will be the focus of this Summit.  With threats on several of NATO's borders and Russia’s ongoing aggression against neighboring Ukraine, which attempts to destabilize Ukraine and the region, the transatlantic commitment to collective defense is more essential now than ever.  In Wales, leaders will discuss issues relating to Russia’s aggression in Ukraine, look ahead to the conclusion of ISAF operations in Afghanistan, chart progress on capabilities and defense spending, and work together on ideas to strengthen and broaden NATO’s partnership agenda.  That each of these issues is clearly relevant to Macedonia demonstrates the significance of NATO here, and I hope strengthens your resolve to continue along the path to NATO membership.

Since Russia’s illegal actions in Ukraine began, the United States and NATO have made absolutely clear that the Article 5 collective defense guarantee to Allies is solid.  Through measures launched in the air, on land, and at sea, with contributions from all 28 Allies, we have bolstered deterrence, signaled resolve, and demonstrated our commitment to the security of Europe.  We will look to do even more at Wales, focusing on enhancing NATO’s ability to respond quickly to any crisis threatening Allied member states’ security, and extending reassurance activities as part of a persistent, rotational presence in NATO’s east.

We have made it clear that NATO condemns Russia’s attempted annexation of Crimea and its actions in violation of Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity.  At the April Foreign Ministerial, Allies decided to suspend all practical cooperation between NATO and Russia while remaining open to higher-level political dialogue.  At the Summit, Allies will reaffirm their April decision for the foreseeable future until Russia changes course, and call on Russia to honor its commitments under international law and the principles on which European security is based.  Allies will also reaffirm NATO’s long-standing partnership with Ukraine, and discuss with President Poroshenko plans to further develop Allied support.

Another key theme of the Wales Summit will be Afghanistan, as NATO and our Afghan partners look to the conclusion of ISAF operations on December 31, 2014.  The Summit will provide an opportunity to strengthen NATO’s Enduring Partnership with Afghanistan and to confirm NATO’s follow-on, non-combat, train, advise, and assist mission pending signature of the Bilateral Security Agreement and NATO-Afghanistan Status of Forces Agreement.  Through great sacrifice, ISAF has restored to the Afghan people control over their country’s future.  NATO will continue to stand with the Afghan people, proud to provide tools and training as the Afghans and their security forces provide the courage and will to succeed.

The final Summit theme I want to mention today is partnerships – a theme particularly relevant to Macedonia.  At the Summit, NATO will express its gratitude to Macedonia and other non-member partners.  NATO recognizes and appreciates that Macedonia shares our values and stands with us, including on the battlefield.  NATO partners such as Macedonia provide significant support to the Alliance and contribute to training, education, and exercises.  We will recognize our partners’ commitments and reaffirm our own commitment to offer the training and other support that will help our partners with reform and modernization.  And we will work to encourage and further develop interactions with these nations and those that devote the most resources and political will to cooperation with NATO.

For 65 years, NATO has safeguarded the freedom and security of its members, promoted democratic values, and helped ensure regional stability for the benefit of members and non-members alike.  The success of the Alliance depends upon the commitment of its member states and the cooperation and support of its valuable partners.  As President Obama said in Brussels last March,  “in a world of challenges that are increasingly global, all of us have an interest in nations stepping forward to play their part, to bear their share of the burden and to uphold international norms.”   
We are grateful to Macedonia for stepping up and playing your part, and we look forward to continuing and strengthening your partnership with NATO.  
Thank you.  

Good morning, and thank you.  It is a pleasure to be here at the Euro-Atlantic Council of Macedonia’s conference on future NATO challenges and expectations.  This is an important topic at any time, but especially now, as we lead up to this week’s NATO summit in Wales, and in the face of new challenges to transatlantic security, especially along the eastern borders of several NATO member states.

NATO is the transatlantic core of the global security community, and it embodies the conviction that North America and Europe are inextricably bound together.  In the years since NATO’s formation in 1949, it has become clear that the security that comes from military cooperation and collective defense also fosters a broader kind of success – it encourages democratization and spurs nations’ economic and political progress as well.  No part of the world has been more prosperous, stable, and peaceful over the last 65 years than the countries that belong to NATO.

NATO’s stabilizing influence helped Europe emerge from the darkness of the Second World War and strengthened bonds between the Allies throughout the Cold War years.  And as the new millennium has brought new challenges of terrorism, demonstrating that political chaos in distant lands can have a devastating effect on Allies at home, and of aggression in eastern Europe, NATO’s security commitment has become even more relevant and significant.  

The world has certainly changed since 1949, when NATO was formed.  As you know as well as anyone, in 1949 the map of Europe looked very different than it does today.  The Alliance stood then as a bridge between two continents, connecting the widely-separated lands of Europe and North America through the bonds of our shared security interests.  And now in 2014, when new technologies allow instantaneous movement of information across formerly formidable physical borders and distances, the Alliance seeks to support global security through non-military approaches as well, while maintaining modern, highly capable, interoperable, and deployable forces.  

Although not yet a NATO member, as a valued partner Macedonia plays an important role in the Alliance.  Macedonia has been a steadfast ally in international peace support operations for more than a decade, contributing 2,786 troops to ISAF since 2003, and 490 troops in Iraq through the end of 2008.  Currently, 153 Macedonian soldiers are deployed to Afghanistan, and Macedonia has committed forces to the follow-on NATO Resolute Support Mission, to help train, advise, and assist Afghan National Security Forces after 2014. 

To increase Macedonia’s interoperability with NATO and support NATO Partnership goals, the U.S. has executed extensive security cooperation programs in Macedonia since 1995, with assistance focused on defense reform, training, and modernization.  In addition, Macedonia and the Vermont National Guard have developed a strong relationship over two decades, engaging in more than 700 military-to-military events, including the co-deployment of 79 Macedonian soldiers in 2010 with the 86th Infantry Brigade Combat Team as part of Operation Enduring Freedom.  Our cooperative military activities with Macedonia speak volumes about the strength of our partnership, and have greatly strengthened the capabilities of the Army of the Republic of Macedonia.

Before I speak about the themes that Alliance leaders will discuss in this year’s Summit, I want to be up front and clear about what the Summit will not address.  I know this is not what Macedonia is hoping to hear, but it’s important to make clear that there are no plans to add new members to the Alliance at the Wales Summit.  And while I wish I had better news to offer, at the same time I want to strongly reinforce that the United States believes that Macedonia will be a valuable NATO member; it is only a question of when.  We remain committed to the Open Door Policy, and we will continue to work with Macedonia, as well as the other aspirant nations, as you continue to reform and modernize en route to full NATO membership.  No one wants Macedonia in NATO more than the United States, and we will continue to be involved in efforts to make that possible.  

So what will be discussed in Cardiff?  Let me mention some of the themes that will be the focus of this Summit.  With threats on several of NATO's borders and Russia’s ongoing aggression against neighboring Ukraine, which attempts to destabilize Ukraine and the region, the transatlantic commitment to collective defense is more essential now than ever.  In Wales, leaders will discuss issues relating to Russia’s aggression in Ukraine, look ahead to the conclusion of ISAF operations in Afghanistan, chart progress on capabilities and defense spending, and work together on ideas to strengthen and broaden NATO’s partnership agenda.  That each of these issues is clearly relevant to Macedonia demonstrates the significance of NATO here, and I hope strengthens your resolve to continue along the path to NATO membership.

Since Russia’s illegal actions in Ukraine began, the United States and NATO have made absolutely clear that the Article 5 collective defense guarantee to Allies is solid.  Through measures launched in the air, on land, and at sea, with contributions from all 28 Allies, we have bolstered deterrence, signaled resolve, and demonstrated our commitment to the security of Europe.  We will look to do even more at Wales, focusing on enhancing NATO’s ability to respond quickly to any crisis threatening Allied member states’ security, and extending reassurance activities as part of a persistent, rotational presence in NATO’s east.

We have made it clear that NATO condemns Russia’s attempted annexation of Crimea and its actions in violation of Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity.  At the April Foreign Ministerial, Allies decided to suspend all practical cooperation between NATO and Russia while remaining open to higher-level political dialogue.  At the Summit, Allies will reaffirm their April decision for the foreseeable future until Russia changes course, and call on Russia to honor its commitments under international law and the principles on which European security is based.  Allies will also reaffirm NATO’s long-standing partnership with Ukraine, and discuss with President Poroshenko plans to further develop Allied support.

Another key theme of the Wales Summit will be Afghanistan, as NATO and our Afghan partners look to the conclusion of ISAF operations on December 31, 2014.  The Summit will provide an opportunity to strengthen NATO’s Enduring Partnership with Afghanistan and to confirm NATO’s follow-on, non-combat, train, advise, and assist mission pending signature of the Bilateral Security Agreement and NATO-Afghanistan Status of Forces Agreement.  Through great sacrifice, ISAF has restored to the Afghan people control over their country’s future.  NATO will continue to stand with the Afghan people, proud to provide tools and training as the Afghans and their security forces provide the courage and will to succeed.

The final Summit theme I want to mention today is partnerships – a theme particularly relevant to Macedonia.  At the Summit, NATO will express its gratitude to Macedonia and other non-member partners.  NATO recognizes and appreciates that Macedonia shares our values and stands with us, including on the battlefield.  NATO partners such as Macedonia provide significant support to the Alliance and contribute to training, education, and exercises.  We will recognize our partners’ commitments and reaffirm our own commitment to offer the training and other support that will help our partners with reform and modernization.  And we will work to encourage and further develop interactions with these nations and those that devote the most resources and political will to cooperation with NATO.

For 65 years, NATO has safeguarded the freedom and security of its members, promoted democratic values, and helped ensure regional stability for the benefit of members and non-members alike.  The success of the Alliance depends upon the commitment of its member states and the cooperation and support of its valuable partners.  As President Obama said in Brussels last March,  “in a world of challenges that are increasingly global, all of us have an interest in nations stepping forward to play their part, to bear their share of the burden and to uphold international norms.”   We are grateful to Macedonia for stepping up and playing your part, and we look forward to continuing and strengthening your partnership with NATO.  

Thank you. 

 

 

 

Публикации

simulacija5